The Digitalisation of African Agriculture Reports

    Agricultural transformation remains one of Africa’s most pressing priorities but has been difficult to achieve. The statistics are well-known: Africa, especially Sub-Saharan Africa, (SSA), needs to double (and perhaps even triple) current levels of agricultural productivity to meet continental demand and stave off food and nutrition insecurity.1 The continent must achieve these targets while simultaneously adapting to climate change. Climate change is already impacting the agricultural sector with increasing climate volatility and the destructive effects of droughts, floods, new pests and diseases. With so much at stake, it is no surprise that most African countries have prioritised agricultural transformation as a key pillar of their national strategies. Yet, as the African Union’s 2018 biennial review of the Malabo Declaration shows, fewer than half of countries (20 out of 47) are currently on track to meet their commitments by 2025….

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Digital Technologies in agriculture and rural areas - Briefing paper

      The agriculture and food sector is facing multiple challenges. With the global population projected to grow from 7.6 billion in 2018 (UN DESA, 2019) to over 9.6 billion in 2050 there will be a significant increase in the demand for food (UN DESA, 2017). At the same time, the availability of natural resources such as fresh water and productive arable land is becoming increasingly constrained…

      Yet, developing economies may also have the advantage of being able to ‘leapfrog’ older agrifood technologies and models in favour of a digital agriculture revolution. This new scenario will require radical rethinking by policy makers, international organizations, business leaders and individuals: ‘business as usual’ is not the solution.

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Digital Technologies in agriculture and rural areas - Status Report

Despite the well-known key trends that the future of food and agriculture are facing: such as growing food demand, constraints in natural resources and uncertainties for agricultural productivity (OECD, 2015a), the projected increase in world population from 7.6 billion in 2018 to well over 9.8 billion in 2050 has received a great deal of attention as an influence on world demand for food (UN DESA, 2017). In addition to this, a rapid rate of urbanization is expected in the coming years, with approximately 66 percent of the world’s population expected to live in urban areas by 2050, compared with 54 percent in 2014. Therefore, 40 percent of water demand in 2030 is unlikely to be met, and more than 20 percent of
arable land is already degraded…

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Digital Economy for Africa Initiative

Over last 5 years, entrepreneurship ecosystem, through incubators, accelerators and tech hubs, has grown 10-fold in Africa.
SS Africa has the highest % of mobile money use in any region, showing that there are opportunities for leapfrogging with new financial technology.
North Africa Egypt and Djibouti have strong international connectivity links

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